In 99.6 percent of US counties, a full-time minimum-wage worker cannot afford an average one-bedroom apartment.

In 99.6 percent of US counties, a full-time minimum-wage worker cannot afford the average one-bedroom. One in four renters spends over half of their income on housing, and 20 million people live in a state of housing poverty, unable to afford necessities like health care and food once they’ve paid their rent. We’ve all heard the statistic about how much more CEOs make than the average worker, but less remarked upon is the fact that the median homeowner is 46 times wealthier than the median renter.Like income inequality, housing inequality has recently reached a peak not seen since the 1930s. In the near-century between the Great Depression and 2012, the median US home cost tripled when adjusted for inflation. Over half of the total value of US housing stock is comprised of the most expensive 20 percent of owner-occupied homes. Residential segregation is rising with households in the top fifth of US income distribution increasingly less likely to live near people in different economic circumstances.

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In 99.6 percent of US counties, a full-time minimum-wage worker cannot afford an average one-bedroom apartment.


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